MedAi : A Pilot with Ready-made Garments Workers in Bangladesh
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MedAi : A Pilot with Ready-made Garments Workers in Bangladesh

In June 2022, MedAi started a case-control trial study in Bangladesh to assess the effectiveness of its AI-driven digital health platform in delivering essential healthcare services quickly and efficiently. Our trial population consists of 2,500 workers, mostly female, from the Ready-made Garment (RMG) industry working in two different locations. A detailed write-up about our pilot design can be found here. With this trial, we aim to develop an understanding of the current healthcare challenges faced by patients in the lower socio-economic groups, their attitudes towards digital healthcare access and challenges adopting it, as well as optimize our digital health platform to ensure easier patient onboarding and overall better healthcare experiences.

It took us almost three months to have all the necessary pieces in place for the trial to start smoothtly. It has been truly enlightling journey in so many different aspects that it deserves a long piece to do a proper justice to each segment. .

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Can we trust AI to deliver personalised health education

MedAi uses artificial intelligence (AI) to deliver personalised healthcare services remotely to patients in their native languages. We are creating short health education videos for several ethnolinguistic groups based on their disease prevalence. Following a medical consultation conducted through our digital health platform, patients can subscribe to personalised health education content that will be delivered to them via the MedAi health mobile app.

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How secure is your health cloud?

Losing data to any type of security breach is damaging to the business but losing patient health data can be catastrophic for the business. Cloud solutions such as AWS, google cloud offers robust, scalable and secure solution to many industries. However, at the end of the day, you have to be the ultimate gatekeeper of your cloud server.

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How Artificial Intelligence is Advancing the Breast Cancer Mammogram Accuracy Rate

Breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women all over the world. In 2015, around 2.4 million women were diagnosed with breast cancer, with 523 000 dying[1]. Because breast cancer is more treatable when found early[2], many nations have implemented screening programs. To reduce breast cancer-related morbidity and mortality, one or two radiologists review a woman's mammograms for evidence of pre-symptomatic malignancy. Although mammography has proven to be an effective technique for the early identification of breast cancer and has considerably reduced mortality, the X-ray imaging method has limits, particularly for patients with dense breast tissue.